Opportunities

Grants

Grants for Animal Rescue to Save More Lives: The Rachael Ray Save Them All Grants

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The Rachael Ray Save Them All Grants fund projects to reduce the number of cats and dogs killed in American shelters. We welcome project proposals from public and private shelters, rescue groups, and other animal welfare organizations that enable lifesaving in a community. 

All projects must demonstrate, with statistics, a direct impact on saving animals’ lives. 

Projects can be focused on just one event/program or can include multiple events/programs.  

Proposed projects should align with regional priorities as identified by the 2019 National Dataset from the Pet Lifesaving Dashboard. Projects that satisfy these priorities will have the largest impact on lifesaving in each region.  

Before you begin an application, please review the priorities for your region to ensure that your project aligns. Contact your regional specialist with any questions you have about priorities and/or how your project meets the requirements for these animal welfare grants. 

Your organization can apply for a grant of up to $50,000, with the amount requested not exceeding 10% of your operating budget.  

Our Fall 2020 Cycle is now closed and we are no longer accepting applications. 


Regional priorities

Southeast (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina)

Competitive proposals must demonstrate, with statistics, a direct impact on saving animals’ lives and/or leading to a reduction in the number of cats and dogs killed in shelters. Proposals without shelter data will not be considered. Priority consideration will be given to projects focused on helping in those areas where the most killing is occurring. Refer to the pet lifesaving dashboard to see where the greatest lifesaving opportunities are your area. 

In the Southeast region, we are looking for programs that:

  • Show a measurable reduction in the number of cats killed in shelters (Types of programming may include targeted spay/neuter, return to field, TNR with intake diversion, or neonatal kitten programs.)
  • Increase live shelter outcomes and/or decrease shelter intake
  • Support programming to reduce shelter deaths (managed intake, pet retention and the launch or expansion of foster programs)
  • Collaboration between organizations to strategically reduce killing in shelters including programs that fund rescue’s ability to pull more adoptable animals

South Central (Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas)

Rachael Ray Save Them All Grants will be awarded to programs that directly reduce killing in shelters through programs that:

  • Directly expand capacity in live outcome programs that may include programs and process improvements that increase adoptions, transports, returns to owner, rescue group transfers or shelter-neuter-return programs (Programs must directly increase live outcomes for animals in the shelter or likely to enter the shelter system, based on data and past practice.)
  • Increase community capacity, thereby reserving sheltering services for the animals in greatest need through intake reduction (The programs, which may include return-in-field, trap-neuter-return or managed intake, must directly support animals likely to enter the shelter system because of current practices and supported by historical data.)
  • Increase lifesaving within the shelter by expanding capacity to support historically vulnerable populations to achieve live outcomes through programs such as foster programs  

Great Plains (Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota)

In the Great Plains region, top priority will be given to projects that demonstrate decreased intake at community animal shelters or increased live shelter outcomes — especially for cats. Foster-based rescue groups interested in receiving grant funds should be reporting their data each month to the Shelter Animals Count Best Friends coalition, working toward minimizing owner surrender and lowering adoption barriers, and be working collaboratively with a shelter or municipal animal control.

Programs that reduce shelter intake could include:

  • Community cat (stray and feral cat) programs
  • Increased access to affordable veterinary care for both owned animals and groups that don't/can't employ vet staff
  • Targeted spay/neuter/vaccine/microchip efforts
  • Returning to owner in the field
  • Owner surrender/intake diversion programming or partnerships (scalable and customized to the needs and capacity of the org)

Increasing live shelter outcomes could include:

  • Increasing the number of animals pulled from municipal shelters
  • Increasing pet adoptions as a result of lowered adoption barriers and improved engagement
  • Developing behavior/training initiatives and partnerships to increase lifesaving and placement for at-risk dogs
  • Transporting animals, particularly cats and large dogs, from high priority communities or shelters

Mountain West (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming)

The Mountain West region will prioritize Save Them All Grants that:

  • Show a measurable reduction in the number of cats killed in shelters (Types of programming may include targeted spay/neuter, return to field and TNR)
  • Are focused on large dogs in southern Nevada, New Mexico or Arizona (Owner support, spay/neuter, behavioral support, or transports are some examples.)
  • Support both cats and dogs on the Navajo Nation. Highest priority will be given to programs that either prevent the necessity for impoundment via spay/neuter and owner support, or result in the direct pulling of animals from animal control facilities - data encouraged.
  • Ensure lifesaving programs can be successful by removing barriers.

Northeast (Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont)

In the Northeast region, grant projects aimed at directly reducing killing in shelters with the highest impacts will be given top priority. Proposed projects MUST demonstrate (with statistics) a direct impact on saving the lives of animals and/or a trend toward reducing the number of dogs and cats being killed.

The top three priority states within our region are New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York. Please refer to our pet lifesaving dashboard to help identify other key communities within the region. Some examples of potential granting opportunities include but are not limited to:

  • Increasing live shelter outcomes
  • Working in conjunction with shelters to show measurable reduction of shelter killing, such as in return-to-field and targeted TNR programs
  • Creating collaborative programs to directly reduce shelter deaths, such as pulls from shelters in need and transfer/transport programs
  • Decreasing lifesaving gap through collaboration with community shelters

Pacific (Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington)

In the Pacific region, competitive proposals must demonstrate (with statistics) a direct impact on reducing shelter killing. Priority consideration will be given to projects focused on helping in areas where the most killing is occurring. Examples include: 

  • Programs that show a measurable reduction in the number of cats killed in shelters. Types of programming may include: 
    • Return-to-field/shelter-neuter-return cat programs (providing healthy impounded stray cats spay/neuter, vaccinations, ear tipping and returning to the outdoor location they were found) 
    • Lifesaving neonatal (under eight weeks) kitten programming 
  • Medical programs for at-risk shelter animals, such as ringworm, parvo/panleuk, or other conditions previously unable to be saved 
  • Programs targeted toward significantly increasing live outcomes for at-risk large dogs 
  • Focus on collaboration between organizations to strategically reduce killing in shelters 

Midwest (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, Wisconsin)

In the Midwest region, we are looking for:

  • Programs targeted toward increasing life outcomes for cats (foster programs, community cat programs, return-to-field programs, barn cat programs and innovative adoption or medical programs).
  • Programs that return to owners in the field
  • Programs targeted toward increasing live outcomes for medium and large dogs (foster programs, behavior programs, adoption programs, promotion programs or diversion programs)

Mid-Atlantic (District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia)

Competitive proposals must demonstrate (with statistics) a direct impact on saving the lives of animals and/or a trend toward reducing the number of cats and dogs killed in shelters. Priority consideration will be given to projects focused on helping in areas where the most killing is occurring. Refer to the pet lifesaving dashboard to see where the greatest lifesaving opportunities are in each state or your state (whichever suits you better).

In the Mid-Atlantic region, we are looking for programs that:

  • Increase live shelter outcomes
  • Show a measurable reduction in the number of cats killed in shelters (Types of programming may include targeted spay/neuter, return-to-field, intake diversion and TNR, or neonatal kitten programs.)
  • Support programming to reduce shelter deaths (managed intake, pet retention and the launching or expansion of foster programs)
  • Focus on collaboration between organizations to strategically reduce killing in shelters